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L'escroc Chirac speaks again

Posted by Helen Wednesday, May 04, 2005

The French President has made another TV appearance, trying to rally the yes vote in France. Opinion polls are becoming a little more even than they were before but the fact remains that despite the united voice of the political establishment and the media, there are a lot of French voters out there who do not want to vote for the Constitution.

In order to overcome this problem, l’escroc Chirac is throwing everything into the battle, disregarding in his desperation how it will all look to other countries. There are, after all, referendums coming in the Netherlands, Denmark, Britain, Ireland and one or two East European countries.

In Sweden a number of Social-Democrat MPs are working towards a referendum in that country as well. (One wonders what the fragrant Commissar or her acolytes and spokespersons might say about that?)

What are they all being told by the French president? According to the BBC website:

“Responding to questions from two French journalists, Mr Chirac denied that the EU constitution would destroy the French social model and replace it with an Anglo-Saxon style economy.

On the contrary, he said, the treaty was "essentially of French inspiration" - it was "the best possible" choice for France.

He called the text the "daughter of 1989", the year the Berlin Wall fell, and "especially the daughter of 1789", referring to the French Revolution.

It would only increase French and German influence in Europe, ensuring that the two founding nations had a decisive say in the new, enlarged EU of 25, he said.”

Frankly, the no campaigns in various countries could not wish for a better present than a clear statement that the purpose of the Constitution is to increase Franco-German influence, whether it happens to be true or not. As a matter of fact, the sceptics in France are right to worry about the EU taking off as an entity all of its own, away from its French beginnings.

In the meantime, something like 25 per cent of the electorate remains undecided. Faites vos jeux, messieursdames.